Reorchestrating Video Game Music

In my spare time, I enjoy reorchestrating video game music. Reorchestration is the process of arranging a piece of music for orchestra and then using high-quality sample libraries (virtual orchestras) to render the piece of music. I’m the Lead Reorchestrator of Metroid Reorchestrated, a website dedicated to transforming the music of the Metroid video game franchise into orchestral masterpieces. Metroid Reorchestrated, or MREO as I will be referring to it from now on, hasn’t been updated in a while because I’ve been quite busy with my Ph.D. coursework and research. Hopefully I’ll have some time this summer to reboot an MREO project called “Metroid Orchestral Fusion” which focuses on arranging/remixing the music of “Metroid Fusion” in orchestral and electronic styles. Please see the link above for more details.

With regards to music making, I specialize in creating high-definition covers of old video game music. I arrange a piece of music for orchestra and then use high-quality sample libraries (virtual orchestras) to render the piece of music. I use Reaper as my DAW (Digital Audio Workstation), and EastWest Quantum Leap Symphonic Orchestra Gold (EWQLSO Gold) and EastWest Quantum Leap Symphonic Choirs as my high-quality sample libraries. Below is a picture of 2011 me holding the boxed versions of EWQLSO and EWQLSC.

So far I have one licensed album of arranged video game music called Aural Nostaliga Vol 1. It was released in May of 2014 and is available on iTunes, Google Play, Loudr, and Spotify for $8.00.

Here’s the tracklist:

  1. "Sol Sanctum - The Elemental Stars" from Golden Sun
  2. "S.S. Anubis" from Jet Force Gemini
  3. "Condemned Tower" from Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow
  4. "Fully Powered Suit" from Metroid: Zero Mission
  5. "Mt. Coronet" from Pokemon Diamond/Pearl/Platinum
  6. "Title Theme" from Metroid Prime 2: Echoes
  7. "Calming Dawn" from Minecraft (remix of "Sweden")
  8. "Phendrana Drifts" from Metroid Prime

Below is a showcase of my work on SoundCloud.

Written on June 14, 2016
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